Free online resource launched for professionals, parents, and policymakers in Deaf Education.
           Quarterly e-bulletins address pressing current issues: Raising and Educating Deaf Children
             


Our Mission
The mission of ISD Outreach is to support families, programs and services for children who are deaf or hard of hearing, throughout the state of Illinois.

We offer the following services:Marcia Breese

  • Training on topics associated with hearing loss
  • Consultations and technical assistance
  • Parent conferences in northern, central, and southern Illinois
  • Annual conference for educational personnel
  • Assessments to identify educational and vocational needs
  • Cochlear Implant support

ISD’s Outreach Services are free and available to parents, teachers, students and educational personnel who work with children who are deaf or hard of hearing in Illinois.

Training, consultation and technical assistance is provided on site or via telephone.
Want more information?  Contact us!

Outreach Services
Illinois School for the Deaf
125 Webster Ave.
Jacksonville, IL 62650

877-339-2686 V/TTY (Toll free)
217-479-4393 Office
217-479-4328 Fax
Email: Marcia.Breese@Illinois.gov

     

 
Calendar of Events
Aug 4

ISD Outreach Statewide August Conference 2014

My Background: Goals, Challenges, and Successes: Smith-Warshaw
Take Charge of Your Interpreting Future: Beaurivage1 Beaurivage2
How to Improve Your Story Signing Skills: Cook
The Buzzing, Blooming Confusion of the Visual World: Dye
What can ISD Outreach do for YOU: Breese
Multicultural or Cross-Cultural: Ullauri
Protecting the Message: Stiles
Transitioning from IFSP to IEP: Saettele

 

Oct 4

Parent Advocacy Training
Wood Dale, Illinois
Presenter: Andrea Marwah

Flyer
Registration

Jun 25-28

2015 ASDC Conference
"Connecting the Dots: Child, Family, Community
Indiana School for the Deaf
1200 E 42nd Street
Indianapolis, IN 46205

Flyer
For more information: www.asdc2015.com

 

 

  

Click on a training title to read the description, then click here to request a training.

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A Little Hearing Loss Is a Big Thing (Impact of Hearing Loss)

This training addresses unidentified mild hearing loss, hearing loss due to colds or allergies, unilateral hearing loss, and temporary hearing loss as well as the needs of students with more severe hearing loss. The impact that hearing loss has on the learning, language, communication, and social/emotional development of a child cannot be overstated. Information in this module includes identifying and accommodating for hearing loss, factors to consider when choosing a method of communication for the child and family, using amplification, and providing needed services for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general education faculty and staff, and those needing a refresher or are new to the field of hearing loss.

Basic Everyday Sign Language for Young Children

This fun and interactive training module discusses the components of sign language, demonstrates basic signs used by young children in their daily routines, provides resources for independent learning, and allows the opportunity to practice signs in a relaxed atmosphere.

Target audience: parents of, and those working with, young children who are deaf, hard of hearing or nonverbal, general education faculty and staff, and day care providers.

Classifiers in Sign Language

People who grow up using an aural language often struggle with how to convey a clear and complete visual message in American Sign Language. This hands-on workshop will provide practice to improve signing skills by focusing on classifiers – signs used to show movement, location and appearance. Depending on the skill level and experience of the audience, participants will work on picture descriptions, English sentences and stories using ASL classifiers.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, college students.

Classroom Acoustics

Students with hearing loss are already at a disadvantage when receiving auditory information. The average classroom has a significant level of background noise that makes listening even more difficult. There are some steps that can be taken to improve the listening environment, which will improve the learning environment for ALL students in the class.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general education faculty and staff, college students and those needing a refresher or are new to the field of hearing loss.

Cochlear Implants

This presentation covers basic information including how a cochlear implant works, the different kinds of cochlear implants, who may be a candidate for cochlear implantation, surgical procedure, expectations, and the need for extended support for children who have cochlear implants. Information on the cochlear implant debate and the Deaf culture perspective is addressed. Online resources will also be provided.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general education faculty and staff, college students and those needing a refresher or are new to the field of hearing loss.

Deaf Culture

This module is presented by a Deaf adult and provides information about different aspects of Deaf culture and Deaf history. The presenter describes his experiences growing up Deaf with hearing parents, and shares practical information on how to communicate with individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing.

Target audience: students who are deaf or hard of hearing, parents, educational interpreters, general education faculty and staff, college students and those needing a refresher or are new to the field of hearing loss.

Educational Interpreting: A Simulation

Learning through the use of an educational interpreter is a difficult task, even for the brightest students. This training module is an "eye-opener" and gives participants an insight into the experience of using an educational interpreter including the challenges faced by students and the educational interpreter themselves.

Target audience: all general and deaf education staff who work with educational interpreters, parents, college students and educational interpreters.

Effective Communication Tools for Parents & Professionals

Few parents are equipped with the knowledge needed to advocate for their children who are deaf or hard of hearing and professionals often find themselves at a loss when dealing with these parents. The information in this module facilitates working together in the best interest of the student, and shares the perspective of parents and professionals. Strategies will be shared to avoid conflict, manage challenges and reduce stress while working toward an appropriate, individualized educational plan.

Target audience: parents, educators, administrators, support staff and college students

Expressive Signing Skills

This presentation is designed as an overview to assist teachers, parents and support staff with improving expressive sign language skills. The training discusses various structure types in ASL including non-manual markers, affect, use of space, and directional verbs. Participants will have the opportunity to practice as well as view experienced signers demonstrating these structure types. This training can be adapted for working interpreters, though other modules will address these topics in more depth.

Target audience: parents, deaf education teachers, and those needing a refresher or are beginning signers.

Fingerspelling

Fingerspelling is something many teachers, parents and interpreters would like to avoid, yet should not. Fingerspelling is the window to a child’s access to new words and helps develop/improve reading skills. This activity-oriented workshop is designed to introduce participants to techniques for improving receptive and expressive fingerspelling.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, deaf education teachers, and those needing a refresher or are beginning signers.

Idioms and Words with Multiple Meanings

The English language contains many idioms, figures of speech, oxymorons and words with multiple meanings. Signing these words and phrases while remaining conceptually accurate can be a challenge. This training will emphasize the importance of determining what the words or phrases mean within the context of the sentence or conversation in order to convey the message accurately. Participants will have the opportunity to review and practice common idioms, oxymorons and figures of speech.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, deaf education teachers, and those needing a refresher or are beginning signers.

Issues in Educational Interpreting: A Facilitated Discussion

In the field of interpreting, there are a multitude of decisions to be made daily. Many of these involve choices that are not clear-cut. This training discusses ethical decision-making using the RID/NAD Code of Professional Conduct as a starting point. While maintaining all confidentiality, this is a facilitated workshop where educational interpreters may freely and openly discuss issues they are currently facing.

Target audience: educational interpreters.

Language Development

This module is designed to help parents and professionals begin to understand the causes of language delay due to hearing loss, and to be aware of some techniques for improving language learning. It includes a variety of strategies for teaching language through reading, writing and experiences, offering the opportunity to develop specific activities to enhance language learning.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general education faculty and staff, college students and those needing a refresher or are new to the field of hearing loss.

Listen Up! Auditory Training in the Classroom

This presentation discusses the tasks that students must perform within the realm of auditory training. Information presented will focus on the rationale behind these tasks. Training ideas and resources will be provided and participants will have the opportunity for role playing and practicing these techniques.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general education faculty and staff, college students and those needing a refresher or are new to the field of hearing loss.

Numbering Systems in American Sign Language

Numbering is more than just signing "1, 2, 3." Numbers are signed differently depending on how they are used in context. This training will explore the various numbering systems used in American Sign Language and how these systems can help students who are deaf or hard of hearing more readily understand a numerical message.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, deaf education teachers, and those needing a refresher or are beginning signers.

Raising Deaf Children

This presentation offers the perspective of a hearing parent who raised two children who are deaf and communicate through the use of sign language. The presenter emphasizes the importance of family involvement in educational and social development. Included are humorous stories illustrating the challenges, struggles, and frustrations as well as the accomplishments and triumphs of raising children with hearing loss. Parents will identify with the presenter and professionals will develop empathy for the parents experiences as a result of attending this training.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, professionals, college students and support staff.

Reading/Writing for Children with Hearing Loss

Because a little hearing loss is a big thing, learning to read/write is a special challenge to children with hearing loss, even those with mild, temporary or unilateral loss. This module addresses the inherent problems encountered and explores ways to help children connect to print. Strategies are suggested to encourage reading/writing and to create a more comfortable environment for children to learn to read/write. Hands-on tips and techniques are offered, spanning preschool through high school, to maximize the reading/writing experience both for instruction and for pleasure. (Reading and writing can be addressed separately or can be expanded to a half-day or full-day workshop.)

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general and deaf education teachers, college students and those needing a refresher or are new to the field of hearing loss.

Receptive Sign Language Skills

This presentation is an overview designed to assist teachers, parents and support staff with improving receptive fingerspelling and classifier skills. Activities for improving comprehension of the signed message and opportunities to practice will be provided. This training can be adapted for working interpreters, though other modules will address these topics more fully.

Target audience: parents, deaf education teachers, and those needing a refresher or are beginning signers.

Role of the Interpreter in the Educational Setting

Working with an educational interpreter is a new experience for most teachers, coaches, therapists, and support personnel. The questions addressed include: What is the role of the educational interpreter? What can they be expected to know? Who decides what sign system to use? What are the responsibilities of school personnel, the educational interpreter, and the student? How does the interpreter fit in as part of the educational team?

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, deaf and general education teachers, and any other staff who works with an educational interpreter.

Signing for Sporting Events (Sports Signs)

Interpreting for sporting events can be challenging! Who is the interpreter working for . . . the student or the coach? Where should the interpreter stand? How does the interpreter sign words with double meanings, or the same word used in different sports? These questions, and more, will be answered in this training module. Vocabulary for specific sports will be taught including signs used when playing volleyball, basketball, football, baseball, soccer and wresting.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general and deaf education teachers, coaches, and college students.

Socialization Skills

Because of delayed language skills and fewer opportunities for incidental learning, social skills don’t just happen for students with hearing loss. Even mild hearing loss can delay the development of social skills. Ways of approaching socialization and social skills training will be discussed. Thoughts for achieving social inclusion in a variety of settings are offered, including community activities, school activities, peer groups, recreation opportunities, etc. The value of a mentor or role model who is deaf or hard of hearing is discussed.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general and deaf education faculty and staff, college students and those needing a refresher or are new to the field of hearing loss.

Special Education Rights

This training is taught by the parent of a child with hearing loss. The presenter will share information about parent’s rights in today’s education system and how to advocate appropriately for needed services. Parents will leave the session better prepared to participate in their child’s IEP meeting as an active team member. Professionals who attend this training will learn about parent’s rights and gain insight into the parent perspective.

Target audience: parents, general and deaf education faculty and staff, and college students.

Stress, Support and Coping

It is a well-known fact that ninety to ninety five percent of children who are deaf or hard of hearing are born to hearing parents. These parents are faced with many challenges, not the least of which is coming to terms with their grief and moving toward acceptance. This module is presented by the parent of two adult children who are deaf, and discusses the challenges parents face, offers information about parents' emotional experiences, encourages parents to acknowledge their feelings, and gives them permission to grieve. Professionals who attend the training will gain a heightened sensitivity toward the parents’ experiences. This presentation can be tailored to address the concerns of parents and/or professionals.

Target audience: parents, general and deaf educators, administrators, support staff and college students.

Students with Mild Hearing Loss

Students who have hearing loss and use the auditory channel for obtaining information face special challenges. They are often mislabeled or "fall through the cracks." The expectation that hearing aids or cochlear implants can completely correct hearing loss isn’t always true—these devices don’t “fix” or cure the hearing loss. The teachers working with these students face special challenges as well. This module discusses these issues and offers tips for accommodations that support student success.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general and deaf education teachers and college students.

TherAPPy Tools for Individuals with Hearing Loss (iPad apps)

Smartphones, tablets and apps are being used in education with increasing frequency as TherAPPy tools. The motto, "There’s an App for that!" holds true for technology that provides accessibility such as captioning and video conferencing, measuring loudness levels in different environments, activities for speech, language and auditory training and also learning sign language. This training provides an overview of how to leverage touch technology, what features are needed when working with students who are deaf or hard of hearing as well as a sampling of apps and where to find free and discounted apps.

Target audience: parents, general and deaf education teachers, and college students.

Theory of Mind (ToM)

Theory of Mind, often referred to in the literature as ToM, is the ability to understand how other people think and feel. It includes the ability to infer other people’s thoughts, beliefs, desires, intentions, etc., which is information used to interpret what they say, make sense of how they act and predict what they will do next. Children with hearing loss sometimes demonstrate delays in developing ToM, which may impact their ability to form relationships. This presentation will examine behaviors and characteristics of children who experience deficits in ToM and the skills required to develop a mature ToM. Real life examples will be shared as well as practical ideas for helping children to develop the skills necessary to maintain meaningful relationships.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general and deaf education teachers and staff, and college students.

Thinking Skills

Many children who are deaf or hard of hearing seem to have difficulty with everyday problem solving. Teachers of children who are deaf or hard of hearing are experts at providing experiences, life skills and information to students who are deaf or hard of hearing. An enormous amount of time is spent teaching vocabulary and language structure, but not much time is devoted to teaching thinking and problem solving skills. This training will explore the reasons for this deficit and strategies for helping students who are deaf or hard of hearing develop the ability to problem solve independently.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general and deaf education teachers and staff, and college students.

Transition: School to Community

This training assists parents and professionals involved in the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing to understand transition planning in the educational process. Participants will have the opportunity to explore the laws relating to transition planning and the major components of a strong transition program.

Target audience: parents, general and deaf education teachers, and college students.

Transliterating

Many educational interpreters use transliteration in the course of their work, but what exactly is transliteration and how do interpreters use it effectively? This activity-oriented training will focus on understanding what transliteration is and how interpreters can convey a message successfully when using a more English-based form of communication. Additionally, the presenter will discuss the features of American Sign Language that are necessary in any transliteration.

Target audience: educational interpreters.

Troubleshooting Equipment

This presentation will offer techniques for troubleshooting hearing aids, FM systems and cochlear implants. Participants will receive resources specific to certain brands as well as general resources.

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general and deaf education teachers and staff, and college students.

Use of Space and Directional Verbs in Interpreting

Educational interpreters are faced daily with the challenge of making information conveyed verbally clear to the visual learner. This training will concentrate on the idea of "show, don’t tell", including how to use space, directional verbs, eye gaze, role shifting and placement to convey a message more visually.

Target audience: educational interpreters.

Voicing for Children I

This training will concentrate on the clients that educational interpreters really serve: the children. How does voicing for children differ from voicing for adults? This module will focus on register, children and adolescent signing styles, the demands and controls in voicing, cultural literacy, and strategies for developing stronger sign to voice skills when working with children.

Target audience: educational interpreters.

Voicing for Children II

This training picks up where Voicing for Children I ended and will reinforce and expand upon techniques and concepts discussed in Voicing I. Additionally, the focus will be on text analysis, how to get the most out of what is seen, and how to work with other interpreters to improve sign to voice skills.

Target audience: educational interpreters.

What is that on Suzie’s Head?

Children who are deaf or hard of hearing and attend general education classes may face challenges when explaining their hearing loss to the other students. This presentation is intended to help ease the student who is deaf or hard of hearing into the mainstream setting by educating classmates and providing basic information regarding hearing loss, hearing aids, and cochlear implants. It can be geared to the specific age/grade level of the students.

Target audience: classmates of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, general education teachers and staff.

Working with Students with Hearing Loss and Additional Disabilities

An estimated 20%-40% of all students with hearing loss have a secondary disabling condition. Because most teachers have not been trained to work with these students, they can present a special challenge. This presentation provides information regarding the various characteristics, behaviors, and learning challenges presented by these students in the classroom setting. The presenters will share some tips for teachers that can be used to enhance learning and provide time for questions and discussion. (This module is intended for new teachers, regular education teachers, college students, interpreters and teacher aides and does not discuss specific additional disabilities in depth.)

Target audience: parents, educational interpreters, general and deaf education teachers, college students, and those new to the field.

 

Greetings!  My role is to provide services to ISD students and students statewide with cochlear
implants.  I am also available to  provide training and support to staff who provide direct services to
students with cochlear implants.

TinaChildress

Check out these compiled cochlear implant resources:

 

 

 


Tina.Childress@illinois.gov

 

 

Tina is nationally-recognized for her expertise on cochlear implants/technology.   
Check out her recent award!

Meet the ISD Outreach Staff!  Click on the photos to read their bios.
All staff may be reached through Marcia Breese's contact information below.

 

 

Marcia Breese

 

Tina Childress

 

Charlotte Denight

 

Amy Dixon-Kolar

Marcia Breese
Coordinator
Marcia.Breese@illinois.gov
(217) 479-4393
Tina Childress
Cochlear Implant Specialist
Tina.Childress@illinois.gov
Charlotte Denight
Education Specialist
Amy Dixon-Kolar
Interpreting Specialist

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth Ann Hull

 

Curt Kuhn

 

Tara Lund

 

Andrea Marwah

Ruth Ann Hull
Education Specialist
Curt Kuhn
Deaf Culture Specialist
Curt.Kuhn@illinois.gov
Kelly Harness
Office Assistant
Kelly.Harness@illinois.gov
(217) 479-4318
Andrea Marwah
Advocacy/IDEA Specialist
andrea.marwah@illinois.gov

 

Need a list of individuals who have requested to be added to our Registry of Illinois Educational Interpreters? Click here.  Please note that the directory is not comprehensive and that the data was provided voluntarily by the individuals listed in it. ISD's Outreach is not responsible for the accuracy of this information.

Interpreter

 

If you hold a statement of approval from the State Superintendent of Education and would like to be included in our registry, please complete this form: Click here.

 

 

 

 

Need a list of individuals who have requested to be added to our Registry of Illinois Educational Interpreters? Click here.  Please note that the directory is not comprehensive and that the data was provided voluntarily by the individuals listed in it. ISD's Outreach is not responsible for the accuracy of this information.

If you hold a statement of approval from the State Superintendent of Education and would like to be included in our registry, please complete this form: Click here.